How Rackspace Operates OpenStack at Scale - The Official Rackspace Blog

As anyone who's ever tried to move a technology from development to production knows, operations and scaling are two of the most difficult elements to do well. Nowhere is that more true than with the OpenStack cloud platform.

Theory of Everything ... well, in Neutron!

In a previous blog post about getting started with neutron , we glanced through workings of OpenStack neutron. This post will allow readers to understand the details of Neutron. As part of this we will cover: Readers wishing to learn more should take a look at our OpenStack training courses.

The death of localhost and the rise of cloud development

If there was any skepticism when Marc Andreessen declared software was " eating the world ," there's little doubt five years later that nearly every business and industry is running on software delivered as online services . The cloud has become the default for practically every industry, from storage to transportation to communication to retail.

Leading Experience and Expertise: 1 Billion OpenStack Hours Served

What can be accomplished in 1 billion hours? It's a number so large it's difficult to put into context. One billion hours, or 114,000+ years ago, humankind was in the early stages of its development, preceding even the earliest human civilizations by more than 100,000 years.

Scaling Magnum and Kubernetes: 2 million requests per second - OpenStack Superuser

We previously described in this blog post how we deployed OpenStack Magnum in the CERN cloud. It is available as a pre-production service and we're steadily moving towards full production mode as a standard part of the CERN IT service offerings to give Containers-as-a-Service.

OpenStack will soon be able to run in containers on top of Kubernetes

OpenStack, the open source project that allows enterprises to run an AWS-like cloud computing service in their own data centers, added support for containers over the course of its last few releases. Running OpenStack itself on top of containers is a different problem, though.